Museums

Museums’ Mosque Lamp Collections:

1. BRITISH MUSUEM:

Brief History of the British Museum

The British Museum was founded in 1753, the first national public museum in the world. From the beginning it granted free admission to all ‘studious and curious persons’. Visitor numbers have grown from around 5,000 a year in the eighteenth century to nearly 6 million today.

Brief History of the collection

The original collection of the British Museum included antiquities, coins and medals, natural history specimens and a large library collection. It now comprises over 8 million objects spanning the history of the world’s cultures: from the stone tools of early man to twentieth century prints.

http://tinyurl.com/3xmllhy

http://tinyurl.com/3y6434w

Note: Two links of the same site contain info of glass mosque lamp; both mentioned above

2. MET MUSUEM:

A Brief History of the Museum

The Metropolitan Museum of Art was founded in 1870 by a group of American citizens – businessmen and financiers as well as leading arists and thinkers of the day – who wanted to create a museum to bring art and art education to the American people.

The collections continued to grow for the rest of the 19th century – upon the death of John Kensett, for example, 38 of his canvases came to the Museum. But it is the 20th century that has seen the Museum’s rise to the position of one of the world’s great art centers. Some highlights: a work by Renoir entered the Museum as early as 1907 (today the Museum has become one of the world’s great repositories of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist art)…in 1910 the Metropolitan was the first public institution to accept works of art by Matisse…by 1979 the Museum owned five of the fewer than 40 known Vermeers…the Department of Greek and Roman Art now oversees thousands of objects, including one of the finest collections in glass and silver in the world…The American Wing holds the most comprehensive collection of American art, sculpture, and decorative arts in the world…the Egyptian art collection is the finest outside Cairo…the Islamic art collection is without peer…and so on, through many of the 17 curatorial departments.

http://tinyurl.com/2wqc445

3. BROOKLYN MUSUEM:

A Brief History:

Opened in 1897 and founded by Augustus Graham, the Brooklyn Museum building is a steel frame structure—built to the standards of classical masonry—designed by the famous architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White and built by the Carlin Construction Company. Daniel Chester French, the noted sculptor of the Lincoln Memorial, was the principal designer of the pediment sculptures and the monolithic 12½ foot figures along the cornice. The figures were carved by 11 different sculptors. French was also the designer of the two allegorical figures Brooklyn and Manhattan currently flanking the museum’s entrance (created in 1916 for the Brooklyn approach to the Manhattan Bridge, relocated to the museum in 1963).

Thomas S. Buechner was named as the museum’s director in 1960, making him one of the youngest directors in the country. Buechner oversaw a major transformation in the way the museum displayed art and brought some one thousand works that had been languishing in the museum’s archives and put them on display. Buechner played a pivotal role in rescuing the Daniel Chester French sculptures from destruction due to an expansion project at the Manhattan Bridge in the 1960s.

From 1971-1974 Duncan F. Cameron served as director, with Michael Botwinick serving from 1974-1982, Linda S. Ferber as acting director for part of 1983, and Robert T. Buck from 1983-1997.

The Brooklyn Museum changed its name to Brooklyn Museum of Art in 1997, shortly before the start of Arnold L. Lehman’s current term as director. On March 12, 2004, the museum announced that it would revert to its previous name. In April 2004, a new entrance pavilion, designed by James Stewart Polshek and facing Eastern Parkway, opened at the Brooklyn Museum.(HISTORY TAKEN FROM WIKIPEDIA)

http://www.brooklynmuseum.org/opencollection/objects/12543/Mosque_Lamp

QATAR MUSUEMS AUTHORITY:

http://www.qma.com.qa/eng/index.php/qma/collections

VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSUEM, LONDON:

A Brief History

Foundation

Henry Cole, the museum’s first director

The V&A has its origins in The Great Exhibition of 1851, with which Henry Cole the museum’s first director was involved in planning; initially it was known as The Museum of Manufactures, first opening in May 1852 at Marlborough House, but by September had been transferred to Somerset House. At this stage the collections covered both applied art and science. Several of the exhibits from the Exhibition were purchased to form the nucleus of the collection. By February 1854 discussions were underway to transfer the museum to the current site and it was renamed as The South Kensington Museum. In 1855 the German architect Gottfried Semper, at the request of Cole, produced a design for the museum, but was rejected by the Board of Trade as too expensive. The site was occupied by Brompton Park House, this was extended including the first refreshment rooms opened in 1857, the museum being the first in the world to provide such a facility. The official opening by Queen Victoria was on 22 June 1857. In the following year, late night openings were introduced, made possible by the use of gas lighting. This was to enable in the words of Cole “to ascertain practically what hours are most convenient to the working classes” — this was linked to the use of the collections of both applied art and science as educational resources to help boost productive industry. In these early years the practical use of the collection was very much emphasised as opposed to that of “High Art” at the National Gallery and scholarship at the British Museum. George Wallis(1811–1891), the first Keeper of Fine Art Collection, passionately promoted the idea of wide art education through the museum collections. This led to the transfer to the museum of The School of Design that had been founded in 1837 at Somerset House, after the transfer it was referred to as the Art School or Art Training School, later to become the Royal College of Art which finally achieved full independence in 1949. From the 1860s to the 1880s the scientific collections had been moved from the main museum site to various improvised galleries to the west of Exhibition Road. In 1893 the “Science Museum” had effectively come into existence when a separate director was appointed.

The laying of the foundation stone to the left of the main entrance of the Aston Webb building, on 17 May 1899 was the last official public appearance by Queen Victoria. It was during this ceremony that the change of name from the South Kensington Museum to the Victoria and Albert Museum was made public. London Gazette of the time ended “I trust that it will remain for ages a Monument of discerning Liberality and a Source of Refinement and Progress.”

The exhibition which the Museum organised to celebrate the centennial of the 1899 renaming, “A Grand Design,” first toured in North America from 1997 (Baltimore Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston and the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco), returning to London in 1999. To accompany and support the exhibition, the Museum published a book, Grand Design, which it has made available for reading online on its website.

1900–1950

Victoria and Albert Museum — Front Elevation

The opening ceremony for the Aston Webb building by King Edward VII and Queen Alexandra took place on 26 June 1909. In 1914 the construction commenced of the Science Museum signalling the final split of the science and art collections, since then the museum has maintained its role of one of the world’s greatest decorative arts collections. At the outbreak of World War II most of the collection was packed away and sent either to an underground quarry in Wiltshire, Montacute House in Somerset, or to a disused tunnel near Aldwych tube station with larger items remaining in situ being sand bagged and bricked in. During the war some of the galleries were used between 1941 and 1944 as a school for children evacuated from Gibraltar. The South Court became a canteen, first for the Royal Air Force and later for Bomb Damage Repair Squads. Prior to the return of the collections after the war, the Britain Can Make It exhibition was held between September and November 1946, attracting nearly a million and a half visitors. This was organised and held under the auspices of the Council of Industrial Design which had been established by central government in 1944 “to promote by all practicable means the improvement of design in the products of British industry”; the success of this exhibition led to the planning of the Festival of Britain. By 1948 most of the collections had been returned to the museum.

Since 1950

In July 1973 – as part of its outreach programme to young people – the V&A became the first museum in Britain to present a rock concert. The V&A presented a combined concert/lecture by British progressive folk-rock band Gryphon, who explored the lineage of mediaeval music and instrumentation and related how those contributed to contemporary music 500 years later. This innovative approach to bringing young people to museums was a hallmark of the Directorship of Roy Strong and was subsequently emulated by some other British museums.

In the 1980s Sir Roy Strong renamed the museum as ‘The Victoria and Albert Museum, the National Museum of Art and Design’. Strong’s successor Elizabeth Esteve-Coll oversaw a turbulent period for the institution in which the museum’s curatorial departments were re-structured leading to public criticism from some staff. Esteve-Coll’s attempts to make the V&A more accessible included a criticised marketing campaign emphasising the cafe over the collection.

In 2001 “Future Plan” was launched, which involves redesigning all the galleries and public facilities in the museum that have yet to be remodelled. This is to ensure that the exhibits are better displayed, more information is available and the Museum meets modern expectations for museum facilities; it should take about ten years to complete the work.

The museum also runs the Museum of Childhood at Bethnal Green and used to run the Theatre Museum in Covent Garden and Apsley House. The Theatre Museum is now closed and the V&A Theatre Collections are now displayed within the South Kensington building.

Regional partnerships

The V&A has no museums or galleries of its own outside of London. Instead it works with a small number of partner organisations in Sheffield, Dundee and Blackpool to provide a regional presence.

The V&A is in discussion with the University of Dundee, University of Abertay, Dundee City Council and the Scottish Government with a view to opening a new £43m gallery in Dundee which would use the V&A brand although it would be funded through and operated independently. The V&A Dundee, which will be on the city’s waterfront and will focus on fashion, architecture, product design, graphic arts and photography. It is planned that it could open within 5 years.

Plans for a new gallery in Blackpool are also under consideration. This follows earlier plans to move the theatre collection to a new £60m museum in Blackpool, which failed due to lack of funding.

The V&A exhibits twice a year at the Millennium Galleries in partnership with Museums Sheffield.

International partnerships

The V&A is one of 17 museums across Europe and the Mediterranean participating in a project called Discover Islamic Art. Developed by the Brussels-based consortium Museum With No Frontiers, this online ‘virtual museum’ brings together over 1200 works of Islamic art and architecture into a single database. (HISTORY TAKEN FROM WIKIPEDIA)

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O802/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O121900/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O93/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1502/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O821/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O804/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1768/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O799/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O815/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O806/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O808/mosque-lamp/

http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O811/mosque-lamp/

Kuwait

http://tinyurl.com/37v4xy7

Iraq Museum

http://tinyurl.com/388bcbx

4. Al SABAH MUSUEM:

A brief history:

Every exhibition has a story , but none is more poignant and symbolic than that of ‘Islamic Art & Patronage”. From its inception as an exhibition meant to share Islamic art with the world , it come to represent a symbol of peace and struggle involving the survival of a culture fight to regain its cultural identity in the face of man’s inhumanity to man.

It all started with the dream of two people, Sheikh Nasser Sabah Ahmed al-Sabah and his wife , Sheikha Hussah Salim al-aabah, who not only wanted to bring together the islamic heritage of their nation but also planned to share it with the world . Between 1975 and 1983, they amassed a comprehensive and impressive collection of more than twenty thousand pieces of Islamic art.

http://tinyurl.com/2ww64mj

5. ACKLAND ART MUSUEM:

A brief history:

William Ackland, a native of Tennessee and an amateur art collector who was also a bachelor, wanted to leave money in his will to establish an art museum at a Southern university. In a 1936 will, he initially narrowed his choices to Duke University, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Rollins College in Florida, in that order, with UNC receiving the donation if Duke refused it. After a visit to Duke’s campus and meetings with the then-eager administration, Ackland decided that only Duke should receive the $1.25 million bequest and removed UNC from his will, with Rollins receiving a much smaller donation. Ackland, who had turned down the chance to attend Harvard College due to family pressure to stay near home, always regretted the decision; it is speculated that he might have viewed Duke as “the Harvard of the South.” Ackland bequeathed Duke his entire fortune on the condition that he be buried within the newly built museum. After Ackland died in 1940, Duke decided the gift had “too many strings attached” and declined it, despite the fact that three Duke benefactors—all from the Duke family—also had been buried on the Duke campus.

Ackland’s nieces and nephews went to court to attempt to get the inheritance themselves, and Rollins College (represented by former United States Attorney General Homer Cummings) and the University of North Carolina (represented by attorney O. Max Gardner) followed in an attempt by each college to receive the funds for the art museum. The relatives took the case to the United States Supreme Court, arguing that since only Duke had been mentioned in their uncle’s will, only Duke could receive the gift and they should therefore receive the money due to Duke’s refusal. After five years, Ackland’s family members lost their case in the Supreme Court, and in 1947 a Washington, DC court found that in his final days, Ackland had been more partial to Rollins than UNC; Rollins should receive the bequest. The Ackland trustees had decided that UNC-Chapel Hill should receive the donation due to both the financial condition of the university and its proximity to Duke, and an appeal of the lower court decision led to UNC being ruled the recipient of Ackland’s bequest (which had grown to $1.4 million) in 1949. (HISTORY TAKEN FROM WIKIPEDIA)

http://www.ackland.org/fivefaiths/06_04_04.htm


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